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Volume: 10 Issue: 8
(August 2012)

Keywords:
mhr remove products containing methylhexaneamine uk market medicines healthcare products regulatory agency (mhr plans remove supplements containing methylhexaneamine (dma

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UK Canada

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MHRA to remove products containing methylhexaneamine from UK market

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) plans to remove all supplements containing methylhexaneamine (DMAA) from the UK market, following its 28 August ban on Jack3D. ‘Methylhexaneamine’ is a ‘specified Stimulant’ banned in competition by the World Anti-Doping Agency’s Prohibited List, however can go by other names, which has led to many athletes unintentionally committing a doping violation.

1,3-Dimethylamylamine HCL is listed as an ingredient in Jack3D and OxyElite Pro, both produced by USPLabs. 1,3-Dimethylamylamine HCL and DMAA are not on the Prohibited List, however the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport lists both as an ‘alternate name’ for methylhexaneamine.
‘DMAA is most commonly used as a workout aid or weight-loss supplement and can have a physiological effect on the body narrowing the arteries and raising the heart rate’, read the MHRA’s statement. ‘This has been linked to suspected adverse drug reactions worldwide, ranging from shortness of breath to heart attacks. It has also been linked to at least one fatality. The MHRA has already issued eight urgent notices instructing retailers to remove the product and any other DMAA containing products from sale.’
Research carried out by BBC Radio 5 Live and World Sports Law Report found that taking DMAA improved presenter Nicky Campbell’s sporting performance. Both Jack3D and OxyElite Pro were found to be available in supplement stores.

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